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8 Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 THE JOURNAL VIRGINIA VIEWPOINTS Pilgrims show America at its best What's Thanksgiving about? Some people will tell you about its religious significance. Others, rightly, will say it's about giving thanks. Still others will talk about the meal. Some, likemy late father and uncle stressed the football. However, almost no one, save for the kids in school pageants, talks about the DAVID S. [(ERR Pilgrims. The only mention of Pil- grims in my house when I was grow- ing up were the two little figurines sitting on either side of the turkey. They wore black and white outfits and funny hats. However, that's a bum rap. These plucky settlers, in their own way, capture the essence of the American spirit. Yes, they were a little strange. They dressed in plain clothes, wore funny hats and were, on occasion, rigid. The only mention of Pilgrims in my house when I was growing up were the two little figurines sitting on either side of the turkey. They wore black and white outfits and funny hats. However, that's a bum rap. That's just one side of them. They also were adventurous. When they decided to come to America, know- ing nothing about the sea, they went ahead and bought a ship. Actually, two. One was unseaworthy, bought from a 17th century "used ship" deal- er, while the Mayflower was a former wine carrier. Its bottom was flatter than most ships and not ideal for a transatlantic voyage. But, off they went. Along the way, they ran into a hur- ricane. Not only did this throw them off course and send them towards New England, but the force of the storm broke a main beam. If it failed, they'd sink. It With a spirit of ingenu- ity that we Americans still take pride in, they used their printing press, with its big screw, to rig a temporary support. It saved the day. Then came their arrival in the New World. They weren't where they were supposed to be and there were already rumblings between the pilgrims and their non-pilgrim associates. They had to devise a way to get along. So, the men of the Mayflower, Pilgrim and non-Pilgrim, wrote the Mayflower Compact. It established a majority rule for making decisions. No one, anywhere, had a government like that. This early form of democracy helped the colony survive. John Adams called the Mayflower Compact one of our nation's founding documents. The pilgrims also learned some economic lessons. When they arrived their plan was to farm the land collectively. The investors back in London liked this approach and thought it would bring them the best return. However, this early experiment in socialism failed miserably and is associated with what the Pilgrims called the "starving time:' After a couple of years of trying collective farming they tried something new. Without the permission of their backers in London, the Pilgrims decided to farm their land individually. It was an immediate success and production boomed. Then there were their relations with the Indians. While our history is dominated by our mistreatment of the first Americans the Pilgrims took a different view. There were conflicts, but overall, when the Pilgrims made agreements with the Indians, they kept them. Also, they showed them respect. After all, the Pilgrims invited the Indians to their first Thanksgiving meals. Peace between new arrivals and the Indians wouldn't be broken until well after the first Pilgrims had died. These were remarkable people and great Americans. They were daring, innovative, individualistic, and a people who tried to live by their beliefs. So, between the football, the food, and giving thanks, raise a glass to these early American settlers. They deserve it. Letters to the Editor Deer-baiting opponents showing ther hypocrisy To the Editor: I read with great interest Mark Fike's Oct. 29, 2014 article entitled, "Survey shows baiting is not welcome in Vir- ginia:' First off, a 59 percent approval rat- ing of hunting using bait isn't that bad. Indeed, if our president enjoyed a 59 percent approval rating, it would be a bragging point by the White House and all of the Democratic party. For in- terest sake, I would like to know what the approval rate would be for using dogs to chase/kill deer (which hap- pens to be a legal practice in Virginia east of the Blue Ridge Mountains). Those who disapprove of using bait to hunt deer need to set aside their hy- pocrisy. How many people use bait to fish and crab ? Hunting over bait does conjure up some idea of lambs going to slaughter but, it's not all that cut and dried. Deer baiting may be illegal in Who Is Jesus Christ? PAID ADVERTISEMENT It is better to speak the truth and be hated than to speak lies and be loved. Jesus was once asked, "What is truth?" He spoke these words, "I Am Xhe Way, Xhe Truth, The Life ..Y Every word that Jesus spoke was absolute truth for all man- Virginia and many may disapprove of the practice but, how many dove hunters sit on or by a fresh cut corn field every September. If a person happens to be wealthy, how big are the apple orchards or corn fields by which they hunt. At present under state law, who is more apt to get many big deer.., the rich land owners awash in crops with a naturally grown bait or the blue collar worker living in a double wide on 5 acres. The use of bait would even up that huge hunt- ing imbalance between rich and poor hunter. Wealthy hunters can boast about .... their big bucks but, their affluence af- kiridand for all time In Hig lifeHe mdde:any:profound statements and many' forded them to hunt over a legal bait hated Him because of what He sai& John 10:30 Jesus said "I and the Father are ...... in the form of crops and food plots. one." In the Greek language the word "one" means one and the same, to the exclusion of others. He claimed to be God in human flesh and He proved it by rising from the dead after three days. Five hundred people saw Him after His resurrection. Here are just five examples of Jesus claiming to be God and there are many more. In John 1:1 and 14, "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was God" "And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory... full of grace and truth." In John 14:9 Jesus said, "He who has seen me has seen the Father, so how can you say show us the Father?" He is also all wisdom, power, life and light of the world to those who believe. In John 8:56-58 Jesus said to the Jews, "Your father Abraham rejoiced that he would see my day. He saw it and was glad" So the Jews said to Him, "You are not fifty years old and you have seen Abraham?" Jesus said to them, "Truly, truly I say to you before Abraham was, I AM." In Exodus 3:13-14, "Then Moses said to God, 'IfI come to the people of Israel and say to them, the God ofy6ur fathers has sent me...and they will ask me, what is His name?' God said to Moses, 'I AM who I AM...I AM has sent me to you.'" The name I AM used in Exodus 3:13-14 was the same I AM Jesus used in John8:56-58. The word I AM means self-existent, eternal God. Jesus clearly claimed to be God. This letter is written in truth and love using the living words of God. My heart's prayer is that all who read this will open up their hearts to the one true living God. What Jesus spoke was absolute truth. There is a great desire in my heart to tell you who Jesus Christ is so that many will come to Him with humility and a repentant heart for your sins and turn from evil so you will be forgiven of all your sins and not only does Jesus forgive our sins but He remembers them no more. Please open your heart to Jesus Christ and come to know His love, for- giveness, mercy and grace. Dale Taylor (540) 273-9037 PAID ADVERTISEMENT If the blue collar hunter should put out a bucket of corn on his 5 acres to improve his chance to see a deer, sud- denly he's a bad guy and a cheater. Meanwhile, the deer dog hunters are not challenged and are considered honorable hunters using packs of dogs to roust deer from places of rest and refuge to get mowed down fleeing in to lines of waiting hunters. If ethics is the question, use the TV Hunting Chan- nel as the yardstick to measure ethi- cal deer hunting. How often are deer hunted by use of bait on the Hunting . Channel? The answer is countless. How many "deer are seen hunted on the Hunting Channel using dogs? The answer is zero. The entire deer bait topic here in Virginia is fraught with hypocrisy, double standards, bias; prejudice and simple ignorance. If the truth could ever be presented in a pub- lic forum, there would be a significant jump from that 59 percent approval. Sincerely, Karl Schmidt Farmville www,journalpress,com SUDOKU 6 7 2 5 3 7 8 6 9 5 1 3 4 5 3 2 8 9 8 3165 719 CROSSWORD PUZZLE CLUES ACROSS 1. Sun up in New York 4. Ghana monetary unit 8. Japan's 1st capital 10. The evil Agagite 11. Burn the surface 12. Win the auction 13. Hollyhock genus 15. With respect to an axis 16. Comportments 17. Secret agent 18. Pastureland 19. Square, rectangle or rhombus 23. Arab outer garment 24. East by north 25. Ambulance initials 26. East northeast 27. A buck's mate 28. I.M. , architect 29. Anti-vaccine actress activist 36. Adult male swan 37. Vietnamese offensive 38. Silver salmon 39. Building fronts 41. W. Austrian province 42. Washed with a solvent 43. Nomadic Sami people 44. Restore 45. Allegheny plum 46. US bridge engineer James 47. Showed the way CLUES DOWN 1. Settle in tents 2. Tuberous Mexican flowers .......................... Y.'B-ulleTs-ttiZt ]eive atrail ..... 4. Language of Andora 5. Distinctive badge 6. Issued each day 7. __ 500, car race 9. Special event venue 10. A Chinese Moslem 12. Relating to atomic #8 14. Signing 15, Military mailbox 17. Patti Hearst's captors 20. Kvetched 21. East by south 22. Rainbow effect (abbr.) 25. Long time 26. Treaty of Rome creation 27. Deliberates 28. Payment (abbr.) 29. Merry temperament 30. Affirmative 31. Public presentation 32. Stirs up sediment 33. One in bondage 34. Family Upupidae bird 35. Made barking sounds 36. 1994 US wiretapping law 39. A companion (archaic) 40. Morning moisture See Page 9for answers The$ol,l00r]t,l0000 [ 10250 Kings Highway Post Office Box 409, King George, VA 22485 Phone: (540) 775-2024 Fax: (540) 775-4099 Online: www.joumalpress.com PRESIDENT Jessica Herrink jherrink@journalpress,com PUBLISHER Jessica Herrink news@journalpress.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Bonnie Gouvisis bonnie@journalpress,com REPORTERS Phyllis Cook pcook@crosslink.com Linda Farneth Iindafarneth@verizon.net Richard Leggitt leggittmedia@yahoo.com SPORTS EDITOR Leonard Banks lenard@jurnalpress'cm COMMUNITY NEWS Lori Deem Iori@journalpress,com DIRECTOR, ADVERTISING 8t SALES Tanya Myles tanya@journalpress.com SALES REPRESENTATIVES Dennis Verdak dennis@journalpress,com Charlene Franks charlene@journalpress.com Carla Gutridge carla@journalpress.com Legal/Classified Display charlene@jurnalpress'cm Church & Commun!ty * Iori@journalpress.com GRAPHIC ARTIST Leonard Banks leonard@journalpress.com PRODUCTIoN/MIS Drue Murray drue@journalpress,com GENERAL MANAGER Robert Berczuk robert@journalpress,com Subscription rate is $24 per year (52 issues), or 50 on newsstands. Outside the counties of King George and Westmoreland, the rate is $38 per year. THE JOURNAL (ISSN #87502275) is published weekly by The Journal Press, Inc, Postmaster, send 3579 to: The Journal, Post Office Box 409, King George, Virginia 22485 8 Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 THE JOURNAL VIRGINIA VIEWPOINTS Pilgrims show America at its best What's Thanksgiving about? Some people will tell you about its religious significance. Others, rightly, will say it's about giving thanks. Still others will talk about the meal. Some, likemy late father and uncle stressed the football. However, almost no one, save for the kids in school pageants, talks about the DAVID S. [(ERR Pilgrims. The only mention of Pil- grims in my house when I was grow- ing up were the two little figurines sitting on either side of the turkey. They wore black and white outfits and funny hats. However, that's a bum rap. These plucky settlers, in their own way, capture the essence of the American spirit. Yes, they were a little strange. They dressed in plain clothes, wore funny hats and were, on occasion, rigid. The only mention of Pilgrims in my house when I was growing up were the two little figurines sitting on either side of the turkey. They wore black and white outfits and funny hats. However, that's a bum rap. That's just one side of them. They also were adventurous. When they decided to come to America, know- ing nothing about the sea, they went ahead and bought a ship. Actually, two. One was unseaworthy, bought from a 17th century "used ship" deal- er, while the Mayflower was a former wine carrier. Its bottom was flatter than most ships and not ideal for a transatlantic voyage. But, off they went. Along the way, they ran into a hur- ricane. Not only did this throw them off course and send them towards New England, but the force of the storm broke a main beam. If it failed, they'd sink. It With a spirit of ingenu- ity that we Americans still take pride in, they used their printing press, with its big screw, to rig a temporary support. It saved the day. Then came their arrival in the New World. They weren't where they were supposed to be and there were already rumblings between the pilgrims and their non-pilgrim associates. They had to devise a way to get along. So, the men of the Mayflower, Pilgrim and non-Pilgrim, wrote the Mayflower Compact. It established a majority rule for making decisions. No one, anywhere, had a government like that. This early form of democracy helped the colony survive. John Adams called the Mayflower Compact one of our nation's founding documents. The pilgrims also learned some economic lessons. When they arrived their plan was to farm the land collectively. The investors back in London liked this approach and thought it would bring them the best return. However, this early experiment in socialism failed miserably and is associated with what the Pilgrims called the "starving time:' After a couple of years of trying collective farming they tried something new. Without the permission of their backers in London, the Pilgrims decided to farm their land individually. It was an immediate success and production boomed. Then there were their relations with the Indians. While our history is dominated by our mistreatment of the first Americans the Pilgrims took a different view. There were conflicts, but overall, when the Pilgrims made agreements with the Indians, they kept them. Also, they showed them respect. After all, the Pilgrims invited the Indians to their first Thanksgiving meals. Peace between new arrivals and the Indians wouldn't be broken until well after the first Pilgrims had died. These were remarkable people and great Americans. They were daring, innovative, individualistic, and a people who tried to live by their beliefs. So, between the football, the food, and giving thanks, raise a glass to these early American settlers. They deserve it. Letters to the Editor Deer-baiting opponents showing ther hypocrisy To the Editor: I read with great interest Mark Fike's Oct. 29, 2014 article entitled, "Survey shows baiting is not welcome in Vir- ginia:' First off, a 59 percent approval rat- ing of hunting using bait isn't that bad. Indeed, if our president enjoyed a 59 percent approval rating, it would be a bragging point by the White House and all of the Democratic party. For in- terest sake, I would like to know what the approval rate would be for using dogs to chase/kill deer (which hap- pens to be a legal practice in Virginia east of the Blue Ridge Mountains). Those who disapprove of using bait to hunt deer need to set aside their hy- pocrisy. How many people use bait to fish and crab ? Hunting over bait does conjure up some idea of lambs going to slaughter but, it's not all that cut and dried. Deer baiting may be illegal in Who Is Jesus Christ? PAID ADVERTISEMENT It is better to speak the truth and be hated than to speak lies and be loved. Jesus was once asked, "What is truth?" He spoke these words, "I Am Xhe Way, Xhe Truth, The Life ..Y Every word that Jesus spoke was absolute truth for all man- Virginia and many may disapprove of the practice but, how many dove hunters sit on or by a fresh cut corn field every September. If a person happens to be wealthy, how big are the apple orchards or corn fields by which they hunt. At present under state law, who is more apt to get many big deer.., the rich land owners awash in crops with a naturally grown bait or the blue collar worker living in a double wide on 5 acres. The use of bait would even up that huge hunt- ing imbalance between rich and poor hunter. Wealthy hunters can boast about .... their big bucks but, their affluence af- kiridand for all time In Hig lifeHe mdde:any:profound statements and many' forded them to hunt over a legal bait hated Him because of what He sai& John 10:30 Jesus said "I and the Father are ...... in the form of crops and food plots. one." In the Greek language the word "one" means one and the same, to the exclusion of others. He claimed to be God in human flesh and He proved it by rising from the dead after three days. Five hundred people saw Him after His resurrection. Here are just five examples of Jesus claiming to be God and there are many more. In John 1:1 and 14, "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was God" "And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory... full of grace and truth." In John 14:9 Jesus said, "He who has seen me has seen the Father, so how can you say show us the Father?" He is also all wisdom, power, life and light of the world to those who believe. In John 8:56-58 Jesus said to the Jews, "Your father Abraham rejoiced that he would see my day. He saw it and was glad" So the Jews said to Him, "You are not fifty years old and you have seen Abraham?" Jesus said to them, "Truly, truly I say to you before Abraham was, I AM." In Exodus 3:13-14, "Then Moses said to God, 'IfI come to the people of Israel and say to them, the God ofy6ur fathers has sent me...and they will ask me, what is His name?' God said to Moses, 'I AM who I AM...I AM has sent me to you.'" The name I AM used in Exodus 3:13-14 was the same I AM Jesus used in John8:56-58. The word I AM means self-existent, eternal God. Jesus clearly claimed to be God. This letter is written in truth and love using the living words of God. My heart's prayer is that all who read this will open up their hearts to the one true living God. What Jesus spoke was absolute truth. There is a great desire in my heart to tell you who Jesus Christ is so that many will come to Him with humility and a repentant heart for your sins and turn from evil so you will be forgiven of all your sins and not only does Jesus forgive our sins but He remembers them no more. Please open your heart to Jesus Christ and come to know His love, for- giveness, mercy and grace. Dale Taylor (540) 273-9037 PAID ADVERTISEMENT If the blue collar hunter should put out a bucket of corn on his 5 acres to improve his chance to see a deer, sud- denly he's a bad guy and a cheater. Meanwhile, the deer dog hunters are not challenged and are considered honorable hunters using packs of dogs to roust deer from places of rest and refuge to get mowed down fleeing in to lines of waiting hunters. If ethics is the question, use the TV Hunting Chan- nel as the yardstick to measure ethi- cal deer hunting. How often are deer hunted by use of bait on the Hunting . Channel? The answer is countless. How many "deer are seen hunted on the Hunting Channel using dogs? The answer is zero. The entire deer bait topic here in Virginia is fraught with hypocrisy, double standards, bias; prejudice and simple ignorance. If the truth could ever be presented in a pub- lic forum, there would be a significant jump from that 59 percent approval. Sincerely, Karl Schmidt Farmville www,journalpress,com SUDOKU 6 7 2 5 3 7 8 6 9 5 1 3 4 5 3 2 8 9 8 3165 719 CROSSWORD PUZZLE CLUES ACROSS 1. Sun up in New York 4. Ghana monetary unit 8. Japan's 1st capital 10. The evil Agagite 11. Burn the surface 12. Win the auction 13. Hollyhock genus 15. With respect to an axis 16. Comportments 17. Secret agent 18. Pastureland 19. Square, rectangle or rhombus 23. Arab outer garment 24. East by north 25. Ambulance initials 26. East northeast 27. A buck's mate 28. I.M. , architect 29. Anti-vaccine actress activist 36. Adult male swan 37. Vietnamese offensive 38. Silver salmon 39. Building fronts 41. W. Austrian province 42. Washed with a solvent 43. Nomadic Sami people 44. Restore 45. Allegheny plum 46. US bridge engineer James 47. Showed the way CLUES DOWN 1. Settle in tents 2. Tuberous Mexican flowers .......................... Y.'B-ulleTs-ttiZt ]eive atrail ..... 4. Language of Andora 5. Distinctive badge 6. Issued each day 7. __ 500, car race 9. Special event venue 10. A Chinese Moslem 12. Relating to atomic #8 14. Signing 15, Military mailbox 17. Patti Hearst's captors 20. Kvetched 21. East by south 22. Rainbow effect (abbr.) 25. Long time 26. Treaty of Rome creation 27. Deliberates 28. Payment (abbr.) 29. Merry temperament 30. Affirmative 31. Public presentation 32. Stirs up sediment 33. One in bondage 34. Family Upupidae bird 35. Made barking sounds 36. 1994 US wiretapping law 39. A companion (archaic) 40. Morning moisture See Page 9for answers The$ol,l00r]t,l0000 [ 10250 Kings Highway Post Office Box 409, King George, VA 22485 Phone: (540) 775-2024 Fax: (540) 775-4099 Online: www.joumalpress.com PRESIDENT Jessica Herrink jherrink@journalpress,com PUBLISHER Jessica Herrink news@journalpress.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Bonnie Gouvisis bonnie@journalpress,com REPORTERS Phyllis Cook pcook@crosslink.com Linda Farneth Iindafarneth@verizon.net Richard Leggitt leggittmedia@yahoo.com SPORTS EDITOR Leonard Banks lenard@jurnalpress'cm COMMUNITY NEWS Lori Deem Iori@journalpress,com DIRECTOR, ADVERTISING 8t SALES Tanya Myles tanya@journalpress.com SALES REPRESENTATIVES Dennis Verdak dennis@journalpress,com Charlene Franks charlene@journalpress.com Carla Gutridge carla@journalpress.com Legal/Classified Display charlene@jurnalpress'cm Church & Commun!ty * Iori@journalpress.com GRAPHIC ARTIST Leonard Banks leonard@journalpress.com PRODUCTIoN/MIS Drue Murray drue@journalpress,com GENERAL MANAGER Robert Berczuk robert@journalpress,com Subscription rate is $24 per year (52 issues), or 50 on newsstands. Outside the counties of King George and Westmoreland, the rate is $38 per year. THE JOURNAL (ISSN #87502275) is published weekly by The Journal Press, Inc, Postmaster, send 3579 to: The Journal, Post Office Box 409, King George, Virginia 22485